Articles and Perspectives on East Asian Medicine

2018: Year of the Earth Dog (February 16, 2018 – February 4, 2019)

By Clinical Perspectives 

  As we try to do most years, we are happy to pass on a compilation of thoughts and predictions for the coming lunar new year.  It was particularly fun this year, perhaps because the dog is an animal that is so familiar in our lives, and it is easy to see both their strengths and weakness, which are the same strengths and weaknesses that we need to be particularly mindful of in 2018. The 2018 Chinese New Year begins on February 16, 2018. It…

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2015: The Year of the Wood Sheep (February 19, 2015 – February 7, 2016)

By Asian Culture, Clinical Perspectives 

  According to Chinese astrology, 2015 is the year of the Yin Wood Sheep (also known as the Goat or Ram), which began on February 19th and will end at the next lunar New Year February 8, 2016, when we enter the year of the Yang Fire Monkey. Sheep Personality Sheep people are natural humanitarians, and are often described as idealistic, generous, and kind-hearted.  They rarely worry about the necessities of life such as food, housing and clothing, but are easily touched by others misfortunes…

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2013: The Year of the Water Snake (February 10, 2013 – January 30, 2014)

By Asian Culture, Clinical Perspectives 

  According to the lunar-solar calendar, February 4, 2013 begins the black water snake year, though New Years Day is celebrated this year on Sunday, February 10th, the new moon day of the first lunar month.  It is the year 4710 of the Chinese calendar and ends on January 30, 2014.  According to Chinese five element astrology, the snake is of the fire element.   But this is a water snake year and is symbolized by water sitting on top of fire.  Because water is the…

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2011: The Year of the Metal Rabbit (February 3, 2011 – January 22, 2012)

By Asian Culture, Clinical Perspectives 

The Year of the Rabbit brings a welcome reprieve from the previous ferocious and dramatic year of the metal tiger, which embodied that animal’s tendency to upheaval and turmoil.  In some traditions, such as in Vietnam, the animal of 2011 is represented by the symbol of a cat. According to Chinese mythology, the essence of the rabbit originated from the moon and as such, this is a yin year and the rabbit is a symbol of endurance.  Rabbit is considered a lucky sign and is…

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2010: The Year of the Metal Tiger (February 14, 2010 – February 2, 2011)

By Asian Culture, Clinical Perspectives 

Chinese New Year Greetings:  Congratulations and Be Prosperous! There are many traditions associated with Chinese New Year, one of which is to greet friends and family with loud, boisterous sayings and phrases, called ji xiang hua 吉祥话. These are usually good wishes for the New Year, happy sayings and auspicious words that are meant to bring good luck.  One of the most common Mandarin new year phrases is simply xin nian kuai le 新年快乐, or ‘Happy New Year’. To differentiate between the Chinese and Western…

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2008: The Year of the Earth Rat (February 6, 2008 – January 25, 2009)

By Asian Culture, Clinical Perspectives 

 Happy Lunar New Year! After two Fire years, life may seem calmer during this Earth year of the Rat. But that could be deceptive… The Rat is the first of the 12 animal signs of the Chinese zodiac. As such, it represents the start of a new 12-year cycle and is a year that favors beginnings. It is an auspicious time for initiating new ventures and breaking new ground, for putting plans into action, pursuing new ideas, directions and ways of doing things. Plans and…

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Special Symbolism of the Chinese New Year Celebration

By Asian Culture, Clinical Perspectives , Dietary Therapy

  Why are peach blossoms and kumquat trees such a welcome gift at a Chinese new years celebration? Why are the Summer Olympics in Beijing scheduled to open on 8/8/08 at 8:08:08 p.m? And what is it about fish served whole, duck, spring rolls, noodles, and bamboo shoots that make them abundant features of the traditional new years meal? From special foods, to particular flowers and lucky numbers, the traditional Chinese new year celebration includes a myriad of auspicious symbols for longevity, prosperity, fertility, and…

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