Case Histories

High Fever and Antibiotics

By Case Histories, Clinical Perspectives , East/West Integration, Herbal Medicine

This case started with a fairly typical flu, most likely caused by a wind-cold pathogen. The prescribed antibiotics constrained the pathogen in the muscle layer. Antibiotics, usually considered cold and bitter, are not appropriate in such situations, which require an acrid warm approach to disperse and release the exterior cold. The patient had a fairly robust constitution, which helped prevent the pathogen from sinking…

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Treating Dry Macular Degeneration with Acupuncture

By Acupuncture, Case Histories, Clinical Perspectives , Internal Medicine

When it comes to the retina, in ancient times, it was not even recognised as a separate part of the anatomy. Now we know it is anatomically part of the brain and nervous system. Consequently spontaneous degeneration of the retina has a similar aetiology and pathology to spontaneous degeneration of the brain and peripheral nerves…

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Postnatal Depression

By Acupuncture, Case Histories, Clinical Perspectives , Herbal Medicine, Women's Health

The commentaries included within the Ji Yin Gang Mu note that there are three major approaches to post-partum emotional disorders. One focuses on “bad blood” (bãi xué) left over after the birth, which rushes to and disrupts the Heart shen. Another emphasizes blood deficiency resulting from the birth process and its attendant traumas.  The last points to pathogenic wind taking advantage of the blood deficiency to attack. Naturally these approaches offer radically different suggestions as to how a problem is to be handled…

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Jade Windscreen Powder

By Case Histories, Clinical Perspectives , Herbal Medicine, Internal Medicine, Theory and Diagnosis

I’m one of those people. I had easily caught colds for most of my life. I wish it were not so. I remember reading about yù píng fëng sân (Jade Windscreen Powder) and thinking my troubles were over. But, after taking it for a week or so, I woke one winter night in a panic thinking the house was on fire. It was not, but I had this odd smell of burning paper in my nose. Which followed me around for a few days until I stopped…

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A Bitter Taste in the Mouth: A Case of Cholecystitis

By Case Histories, Classics, Clinical Perspectives , Herbal Medicine, Internal Medicine

In the formulas used above, the essence of both Xiao Chai Hu Tang and its cousin Da Chai Hu Tang can be seen. Of these, Da Chai Hu Tang is more commonly indicated for the treatment of cholecystitis. In prescribing, however, I considered Xiao Chai Hu Tang as the core formula because the tongue coat was not yellow, the pulse wiry but not forceful, the stool was normal and there was no irritability. At the second visit, I added Bai Shao in order to soften the Liver and relax spasm, as well as to preserve the yin in the presence of so many draining herbs..

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